Drum heating is a process that can be required when thick, viscous liquids need to be transferred or pumped from one container to another. It can also be used simply to stop those liquids from becoming completely solid or freezing. Examples of these liquids include fat, grease, syrups, chocolate, tar, lubricants and other related substances. What these different liquids have in common is that they are typically difficult to move at room temperature or below due to their partially solid state.

A drum heating oven is usually used to aid the process of moving or pumping such liquids because raising their temperature makes them more fluid. It might be necessary to heat the substance to room temperature or higher, depending on its individual melting point and the task required. Usually drum heaters work using either steam or electric heating elements to change the temperature of their contents.

A few benefits of drum heaters include the following:

They are generally built to accommodate multiple drums of the same specific size, so economies of scale are available.

By returning viscous liquids to a more practical liquid form, they can prevent waste materials being generated.

Liquids which are heated and able to move more freely can speed up production processes.

Precise controls are used on the ovens to ensure they only heat to the optimum temperature and the results are predictable.

For some it is questionable as to whether drum heaters can be an energy-efficient solution, due to the fact that they must be continuously used in order to maintain the temperature of a substance. However, there are a few specific arguments against that.

Certain types of high quality drum heating ovens in particular use modern technology to maximise heating performance with relatively low fuel consumption.

It is often necessary to use drum heaters only as and when required. For the rest of the time, some liquids can be stored in their natural state below their melting point with no problems. This depends on the specific liquid because not all substances will stand up to being solidified and melted multiple times without loss of quality.

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Could You Be Entitled To Free Cavity Wall Insulation?

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Cavity walls are present on the majority of brick-built houses dating from the early 20th century or later. Since warm air can be trapped in the space inside a cavity wall, forming an additional barrier between the inside and outside, these make buildings better at keeping heat in and save on energy bills, especially when insulating materials are fitted in the cavity. Typically, the process of insulating a cavity wall would start by confirming that the structure of the wall allows for it. A hole would usually be drilled in the outside wall to access the cavity, and from there insulation materials such as wool or foam can be injected into the space. As long as appropriate ventilation is also fitted, this simple process is enough to significantly improve the energy efficiency of many homes in a safe and cost-effective way. Tip: You can actually distinguish them by the pattern of the bricks from the outside in a lot of cases. If all the bricks look the same size and are arranged facing the same way, there is most likely a cavity between two layers of the wall. If the bricks alternate in size and shape, this means the wall is probably one solid construction and there is no cavity area. Once you’ve established that your walls have the capacity to be insulated from the inside, the next question is whether this can be done for free. Depending on a few factors, you may be entitled to this under the government’s ECO (Energy Company Obligations) scheme. Usually your entitlement to free cavity wall insulation will depend on things like your household income, whether you have children living with you, if you are disabled, any benefits you and receive and various other factors. Please follow and like us:
Cavity Wall Insulation